This Is How Apple’s New MacBook Pro Keyboard Is Dust-Protected

The tech giant Apple launched last week, a new generation of MacBook Pro with up to 4 TB SSD and 32 GB of RAM. In addition to the specifications (and high price), it stands out by the third-generation keyboard, which promises “quieter typing”. And, according to iFixit, the keys have a protection that prevents the entry of dust.

While dismantling the new MacBook Pro, iFixit found that the mechanism beneath each key is protected by a thin silicone barrier. This prevents waste entry and reduces noise when typing.
Since 2015, each key on the MacBook Pro uses a mechanism that resembles the wings of a butterfly. This reduces the thickness of the button and, according to the tech giant Apple, distributes finger pressure more evenly than the traditional scissor mechanism found in other notebooks.


However, the company is being processed because this keyboard accumulates more dust, and the keys may stop working when this happens. Since then the tech giant Apple has announced a free repair program to solve this even in MacBooks Pro out of warranty.
So why does not the tech giant Apple say it has improved the keyboard to prevent the entry of dust? John Gruber of Daring Fireball lists two reasons. First, it could not say that it fixed the problem, otherwise it would be admitting that there is a problem and would increase the risk of losing in court – after all, the lawsuits are still being tried.
And, secondly, that would not make sense from a marketing point of view. It continues to sell the second generation of its keyboard in MacBooks without Touch Bar.
The tech giant Apple tells The Verge that its third-generation keyboard is not designed to solve dust accumulation and this problem affected only a very small fraction of its users.
The company did not even want to explain how it reduced the typing volume – we only learned about the silicone membrane after iFixit was dismantled the new generation MacBook.

A little less noise when typing

The TechCrunch tested the new MacBook keyboard, comparing it to the second generation without silicone barrier. Here, a podcast microphone recorded a person by typing the phrase “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog”.
It’s not a highly scientific test, but it shows the difference in volume – and it’s not that big. The old keyboard has a typewriter sound, with clicks perceptible to each keystroke.
Meanwhile, the new version is a little more muffled but still seems to be a bit noisy. Noise is another complaint some users have with the “butterfly” keyboard of the MacBook Pro.

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